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Melaka: A Walk Back In Time (Day 1)
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Melaka: A Walk Back In Time (Day 1)
WRITER: Yang Huiwen PHOTOS BY: Alvin Toh
Melaka: A Walk Back In Time (Day 1) 15. January 2018, by Yang Huiwen, Photos by Alvin Toh
The historical town of Melaka is an accessible four-hour drive from Singapore, making it a convenient weekend getaway from fast-paced city life.

Remnants of its colonial past are evident in the mix of Portuguese, Dutch and British architecture in addition to the Peranakan culture. During our 2 day, 1 night stay there, we surprised ourselves with the variety of interesting sights and flavours one could discover.

Day 1

9.15am – An aromatic coconut scent greeted u when we took our seats at Shin Loong eatery, our breakfast place. A charming old shot tended by Mdm Koh Kin Hong, 70, this humble eatery located at 56, Jalang Hang Kasturi has been in business for the past 60 years. Waking up at 2am every day, Mdm Koh prepares local fares such as Nasi Lemak, Nasi Kunyit and fried noodles, selling them at just RM2 per plate to the hungry breakfast crowd. Breakfast eaters can also look forward to rounding up their meal with handmade Kueh Lapis and Rempah Udang.

10.20am – With our tummies satisfied, we began our day-long exploration of Melaka, stopping by at Kampong Kling Mosque first. Central to the Malays community in Melaka, the mosque was built in 1748 and conservation works were completed in 19999. The mosque is a splendid blend of architectural elements from the Sumatran, Chinese, Hindu and Malay cultures.

Rice noodles ready for the breakfast crowd at Shin Loong eatery.

Shin Loong eatery, a charming old shop that has been around for the past 60 years.

Kampong Kling mosque, built in 1748.

Kampong Kling mosque, built in 1748.

Kampong Kling mosque, built in 1748.

11.10am – After feasting our eyes on the architectural design of the mosque, we made our way to Cheng Hoon Teng Chinese Temple, which is also known as “Temple of Clear Clouds” in the Hokkien dialect. The oldest and grandest temple in Melaka, the temple was founded in early 17th century, around 1645. Unlike the mix of cross cultural architectural styles that made up Kampong Kling Mosque’s design, Cheng Hoon Teng Chinese temple reflected particular temple styles of Fujian and Guangdong provinces, white the curved roof ridges and intricate gable designs emulated southern Chinese craftsmanship.

12.25pm – We were ready for lunch, judging by the hungry growls after the morning’s walk. We eagerly made our way to a Teo Soon Loong Chan Teochew Seafood Restaurant. Upon the recommendations of the third generation owner, we tried many of their famous dishes, including kalian stem with ‘yong yoke’ that tasted like dried meat. We were told that we couldn’t get this dish from anywhere else. Creamy yet not too sweet tam paste was a good way to end our meal. We bought the convenient packs of the yam paste on the spot as it was too good to miss.

2.50pm – A two-storey building that was originally built in the 18th century, it was restored by local heritage board Badan Warisan Malaysia. Stepping into 8 Heeren Street, we were able to get an idea of how a typical early shop house or residential abode of Melaka between the mid-17th to late 19th century looked like. Despite how the perishable building materials from the past were replaced with durable ones, the strict adhesion to the Dutch planning regulations of the 1700s provided us with a good glimpse of the social environment at that time.

3.55pm – Melaka is also famous for the sale of antiques when it comes to shopping options. For a cultural souvenir, do drop by Sayyid Antique, a shop selling a fascinating collection of antique road signs started out as a hobby for shop owner, 58 year-old Encik Mohd Said Salleh, but passion and keen interest from visitors around the world encouraged him to keep his business going for 40 years now. The shop is frequented by visitors from Singapore, Australia, and also Kuala Lumpur, who often buy these signages for display or to add to their own collection.

The shophouse at 8 Heeren Street forms and integral part of the early city’s vibrant commercial sector.

The shophouse at 8 Heeren Street forms and integral part of the early city’s vibrant commercial sector.

Sayyid Antique, a shop with an interesting collection of antique road signs.

Sayyid Antique, a shop with an interesting collection of antique road signs.

Sayyid Antique, a shop with an interesting collection of antique road signs.

6.00pm – As the sun began to set and cast the town in a warm glow, we made our way back to Casa del Rio’s River Grill, the restaurant of choice for fine dining in the area, which overlooks the Melaka river. The selection of grilled seafood and meat, board choice of wines as well as the scenic views all add up to a charming riverside dining experience on should not miss.

Read more as we share Day 2 of our trip in Melaka.

H DIRECTORY

Shin Loong Eatery
56, Jalan Hang Kasturi, 75200 Melaka
Opening hours: 6.30am to 11am, daily

Kampong Kling Mosque
Jalan Tukan Emas, 75200 Melaka

Cheng Hoon Teng Chinese Temple
25 Jalan Tokong, 75200 Melaka

Teo Soon Loong Chan Teochew Seafood Restaurant
No. 42 & 44, Jalan KPKS 1,
Kompleks Perniagaan Kota Syahbandar, 75200 Melaka
Opening hours: 12.30pm to 2.30pm / 6pm to 9.30pm, Tuesday to Sunday
Closed on Monday

No. 8 Heeren Street Heritage Centre
8 Jalan Tun Tan Cheng Lock, 75200 Melaka
Opening hours: 11am to 4pm, daily.
Closed on Public Holidays.

Sayyid Antique
74, Lorong Hang Jebat, 75200 Melaka.
Opening hours: 10am to 6pm, daily

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